About the Constitution History

About the Constitution History

Kenya has had two documents called “Constitution” during the colonial period and two since independence, before the current one that was adopted in 2010.  The only one that ordinary citizens have had any role in making is the current one. The constitutions in the 1950s were sometimes called after the Secretaries of State (Ministers) for the Colonies: Lyttleton (1954) and Lennox-Boyd (1957), but were mainly written by the Governor in Nairobi, Baring.  The 1963 Constitution was negotiated between the British and Kenyan leaders at Lancaster House in London. It was changed several times not long after independence, including abandoning the system of regional government (majimbo). But it was not formally replaced until 1969, with a  new document that brought together all the changes that had been made. That remained the Constitution (though with many other things changed such as introducing the one-party state, then re-introducing multi-party) until 2010. After the post-election violence, 2007-8, further changes introduced the power-sharing arrangement with a Prime Minister as well as President, and provided for the Constitution to be replaced through a revived constitution making process (see “Drafts” tab). This led to the 2010 Constitution.

Katiba Institute

Kenya National Library Services

 

B.I.E.A